Hotel Infinity: Part Five

Hotel Infinity1Tova Brown concludes her exploration of the Hilbert’s Hotel Paradox with a look at the cardinality of the real numbers.

You run a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. You pride yourself on accommodating everyone, even guests arriving in infinitely large groups — but some infinities are more infinite than others, as it turns out.

Tova Brown
Hotel Infinity: Part Five

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Hotel Infinity: Part Four

Hotel Infinity1Tova Brown dives deeper into Hilbert’s Hotel Paradox, considering the difference between rational numbers and reals.

You run an infinitely large hotel, and are happy to realize that you can accommodate an infinite number of infinite groups of guests.

However, a delicate diplomatic situation arises when a portal to another universe opens, introducing a different kind of guest, in a different kind of group.

Can you make room for them all?

Tova Brown
Hotel Infinity: Part Four

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Hotel Infinity: Part Three

Hotel Infinity1Tova Brown continues to examine Hilbert’s Hotel Paradox, pondering infinite sets of infinite sets.

As the proprietor of an infinitely large hotel, you pride yourself on welcoming everyone, even when the rooms are full. Your hotel becomes very popular among infinite sports teams, as a result.

Recruitment season presents a challenge, however, when many infinite teams arrive at once. How many infinite teams can stay in a single infinite hotel?

Tova Brown
Hotel Infinity: Part Three

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Hotel Infinity: Part Two

Hotel Infinity1Tova Brown explores the second part of Hilbert’s Hotel Paradox. What’s infinity plus infinity?

Running an infinite hotel has its perks. Even when the rooms are full you can always find space for new guests, so you proudly welcome everyone who appears at your door.

When two guests arrive at once, you make room. When ten guests arrive, you accommodate them easily. When a crowd of hundreds appears, you welcome them all.

Is there no limit to your hospitality?

Tova Brown
Hotel Infinity: Part Two

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Hotel Infinity: Part One

Hotel Infinity1Tova Brown’s introduction to Hilbert’s Hotel Paradox, a riddle about the nature of infinity…

Once upon a time, there was a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. You might be thinking this is impossible, and if so you’re right. A hotel like this could never exist in the real world.

But fortunately we’re not talking about the real world, we’re talking about math. And when we do math we can make up whatever rules we want, just to see what happens.

Tova Brown
Hotel Infinity: Part One

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Infinite Cake: Don Cohen’s Infinite Series for Kids

Strawberry Cream Cake

Math Concepts: division as equal sharing, naming fractions, adding fractions, infinitesimals, iteration, limits
Prerequisite: able to identify fractions as part of a whole

This is how I tell the story:

  • We have a cake to share, just the two of us. It’s not TOO big a cake, ‘cuz we don’t want to get sick. A 8 × 8 or 16 × 16 square on the graph paper should be just right. Can you cut the cake so we each get a fair share? Color in your part.

Bobby Flay German Chocolate Cake

  • How big is your piece compared to the whole, original cake?
  • But you know, I’m on a diet, and I just don’t think I can eat my whole piece. Half the cake is too much for me. Is it okay if I share my piece with you? How can we divide it evenly, so we each get a fair share? How big is your piece?
  • How much of the whole, original cake do you have now? How can you tell?
  • I keep thinking of my diet, and I really don’t want all my piece of cake. It looks good, but it’s still just a bit too big for me. Will you take half of it? How big is that piece?
  • Now how much of the whole, original cake do you have? How could we figure it out?
    [Teaching tip: Don’t make kids do the calculation on paper. In the early stages, they can visualize and count up the fourths or maybe the eighths. As the pieces get smaller, the easiest way to find the sum is what Cohen does in the video below‌—‌identify how much of the cake is left out.]
  • Even for being on a diet, I still don’t feel very hungry…

Continue reading Infinite Cake: Don Cohen’s Infinite Series for Kids

Pondering Large Numbers

Inflation & Gold

[Feature photo above by Paolo Camera (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.]

Half of our students were missing from this month’s homeschool teen math circle, but I challenged the three who did show up to wrap their brains around some large numbers. Human intuition serves us well for the numbers we normally deal with from day to day, but it has a hard time with numbers outside our experience. We did a simple yet fascinating activity.

First, draw a line across a page of your notebook. Label one end of the line $20 (the amount of money I had in my purse), and mark the other end as $1 trillion (rough estimate of the US government’s yearly overspending, the annual deficit):

large-numbers-baseline

  • Where on that line do you think $1 million would be?

Go ahead, try it! The activity has a much greater impact when you really do it, rather than just reading. Don’t try to over-think this, just mark wherever it feels right to you.

The kids were NOT eager to commit themselves, but I waited in silence until everyone made a mark.

  • Okay, now, where do you think $1 billion would be?

This was a bit easier. Once they had committed to a place for a million, they went about that much farther down the line to mark a billion.

Continue reading Pondering Large Numbers