Happy Birthday, Princess Kitten!

Princess Kitten

Our youngest child turns 9 today. Time shoots by at rocket speed, doesn’t it? Every year, the older kids complain that their baby sister isn’t allowed to grow up — they still feel like being nine years old themselves!

I have mentioned before our family tradition of the “hidden present.” [See this post and that.] Every year, one birthday present is hidden somewhere in the house, with the clue placed in an envelope to be opened after all the other gifts are unwrapped.

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Quotations XVII: If People Don’t Believe That Mathematics Is Simple…

Quotes from my blackboard during October:

Experience is the hardest kind of teacher. It gives you the test first, and the lesson afterward.

Vernon Law

What, after all, is mathematics but the poetry of the mind, and what is poetry but the mathematics of the heart?

David Eugene Smith

Continue reading Quotations XVII: If People Don’t Believe That Mathematics Is Simple…

Happy Birthday, Sweet 17!

Beach partyI described in a previous post our family tradition of hiding one present on each child’s birthday. Today’s hidden present rhyme was more successful than recent ones — the birthday girl was temporarily stumped and needed a hint from her older sister. Can you guess where they found the gift?

As always, the outside of the envelope is the same:

I’m your last present.
Can you find me?
I’m hiding some place
That you can’t see…

Continue reading Happy Birthday, Sweet 17!

I’m Your Birthday Present. Can You Find Me?

One of our favorite family traditions for young children is the “hidden present.” Every year, one birthday present is hidden somewhere in the house, with the clue placed in an envelope to be opened after all the other presents are unwrapped.

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Fraction Division — A Poem

[Rescued from my old blog.]

Division of fractions is surely one of the most difficult topic in elementary arithmetic. Very few students (or teachers) actually understand how and why it works. Most of us get by with memorized rules, such as:

Ours is not to reason why;
just invert and multiply!

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