Playful Math Journaling with a Cat

As queen of the house, Cimorene insists on being involved in anything that happens in her domain. This includes promoting the Playful Math Journaling Kickstarter.

So she created a cat math journaling prompt to help your children experience the fun of playing around with math.

But first, she encourages you to visit the Kickstarter page and download the free 16-page printable Math Journaling Sampler file. Your kids will love solving Cimorene’s puzzle on one of the parchment-style pages!

Visit the Kickstarter

Here is Cimorene’s Puzzle

“The Princess of Cats has a luxuriously soft tail about 12 inches (30 cm) long. Her tail is three times the length of her noble head. Her beautiful, furry body is as long as head and tail together. How long is the Princess from her delicate nose to the tip of her majestic tail?”

So, how does math journaling work? What do children do with a problem like this?

They may want to make a list of the things they know from the story. Perhaps they will draw a picture of the cat and label the proportions. Each will take their own approach to figure it out.

And then the best part of any math journal prompt is when kids make their own math.

  • Can they write a new puzzle about their own pet?
  • Or about their favorite animal?

Encourage your children to share their math creations with their friends and family.

Cimorene would love to read it, too! If you share your story in the comments section below, I will be sure to show it to her.

And remember to back the Playful Math Journaling Kickstarter so your whole family can enjoy the adventure of playing with math!

Playful Math Journaling: Preorder on Kickstarter

Are you looking for new ways to explore math with your kids?

Would you like an easy, no-prep resource for creative problem-solving, number play, math art, word problems, mini-essays, math poetry, geometry investigations, research projects, and much more?

I’ve just launched a Kickstarter project for people to preorder my new book, 312 Things To Do with a Math Journal. It just might transform your child’s experience of math.

In a math journal, children explore their own ideas about numbers, shapes, and patterns through drawing or writing in response to a question. Journaling teaches them to see with mathematical eyes. Not just to remember what we adults tell them, but to create their own math.

Scroll down the Kickstarter project page to download the free 16-page printable “Math Journaling Sampler” file. It includes one of my all-time favorite math activities.

If you like what you see, I’d love to have your support. The more people we can get to share the project in the early days, the more likely Kickstarter will join in and promote it to new readers.

Have fun playing math with your kids!

Visit the Playful Math Journaling Kickstarter page

Math Journals: Save the Cat!

Puck is concerned that some people don’t understand the idea behind the Math Rebel journals. He decided to create a journaling prompt so your children can experience the joy of creative reasoning (and save cats from their mortal enemy!)

Journaling is a great way to help children learn to see with mathematical eyes. Not just to remember what we tell them, but to create their own math.

Many people know it’s important for students to do hands-on experiments in science. But Puck realized that most adults don’t know how to do a math experiment.

So Puck created this Cat Escape puzzle…

Continue reading Math Journals: Save the Cat!

Make Sense of Math

So, I decided to rewrite the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

Here’s the final installment…

Math Tip #8: Make Sense of Math.

  • Use the patterns you discover to help you solve problems.
  • Don’t get lost in the details of a problem. Look for general truths.
  • Apply common sense to math situations.
  • Think about how different things are similar.
  • Think about how similar things are different.
  • Remember that your mind is your most important math tool.
  • Pay attention to your thinking process. What patterns do you find there?

Continue reading Make Sense of Math

Discern Patterns

I’m almost done rewriting the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

They say mathematics is the science of patterns. So here’s…

Math Tip #7: Discern Patterns.

  • Look for patterns in numbers, shapes, and algebra equations.
  • Notice how numbers can break apart to make a calculation easier.
  • Number patterns morph into algebra rules.
  • Adapt math situations to make the structure clear. (For example, by adding new lines to a geometry diagram.)
  • Step back from a situation to see it from a new perspective.
  • Try to find simpler patterns within complex equations or diagrams.
  • Not all patterns continue forever. Test your patterns. Can you trust them?

Continue reading Discern Patterns

Say What You Mean

Continuing my project of rewriting the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

Here’s my version of SMP6…

Math Tip #6: Say What You Mean.

  • Words can be tricky, so watch your language.
  • Label drawings and graphs to make them clear.
  • If you use a variable, tell what it means.
  • Care about definitions and units.
  • Pay attention to rules (like the order of operations).
  • Use symbols properly (like the equal sign).
  • Understand precision. Never copy down all the digits on a calculator.

Continue reading Say What You Mean

Master Your Tools

As I’ve mentioned before, I decided to try my hand at rewriting the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

Here’s my version of SMP5…

Math Tip #5: Master Your Tools.

  • Collect problem-solving tools.
  • Practice until you can use them with confidence.
  • Classic math tools: pencil and paper, ruler, protractor, compass.
  • Modern tools: calculator, spreadsheet, computer software, online resources.
  • Physical items: dice, counters, special math manipulatives.
  • Tools for organizing data: graphs, charts, lists, diagrams.
  • Your most important weapon is your own mind. Be eager to explore ideas that deepen your understanding of math concepts.

Continue reading Master Your Tools

Look Beneath the Surface

So, I decided to try my hand at rewriting the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

Here’s the fourth installment…

Math Tip #4: Look Beneath the Surface.

  • Notice the math behind everyday life.
  • Examine a complex situation. Ignore the parts that aren’t relevant.
  • Pay attention to the big picture, but don’t lose track of the details.
  • Make assumptions that simplify the problem.
  • Express the essential truth using numbers, shapes, or equations.
  • Test how well your model reflects the real world.
  • Draw conclusions. Explain how your solution relates to the original situation.

Continue reading Look Beneath the Surface

Know How to Argue

You may remember, I decided to try my hand at rewriting the Standards for Mathematical Practice into student-friendly language.

My kids loved to argue. Do yours?

Math Tip #3: Know How to Argue.

  • Argue respectfully.
  • Analyze situations.
  • Recognize your own assumptions.
  • Be careful with definitions.
  • Make a guess, then test to see if it’s true.
  • Explain your thoughts. Give evidence for your conclusions.
  • Listen to other people. Ask questions to understand their point of view.
  • Celebrate when someone points out your mistakes. That’s when you learn!

Continue reading Know How to Argue

W.W. Sawyer’s Rules of Mathematics

“In the beginnings of arithmetic and algebra, the main purpose is not to get the pupil making calculations. The main purpose is to get him into the habit of thinking, and to show him that he can think the problems out for himself.

“Pupils ask ‘Am I allowed to do this?’ as if we were playing a game with certain rules.

“A pupil is allowed to write anything that is true, and not allowed to write anything untrue!

“These are the only rules of mathematics.”

—W. W. Sawyer, Vision in Elementary Mathematics

[THE FINE PRINT: I am an Amazon affiliate. If you follow the link and buy something, I’ll earn a small commission (at no cost to you). But this book is a well-known classic, so you should be able to order it through your local library.]

Inspired by Sawyer’s Two Rules

I love this quote so much, I turned it into a printable math activity guide. I hope it helps inspire your students to deeper mathematical thinking.

Here’s the product description…

Join the Math Rebellion: Creative Problem-Solving Tips for Adventurous Students

Take your stand against boring, routine homework.

Fight for truth, justice, and the unexpected answer.

Join the Math Rebellion will show you how to turn any math worksheet into a celebration of intellectual freedom and creative problem-solving.

Help your students practice thinking for themselves as they follow the Two Rules of the Math Rebellion: “A pupil is allowed to write anything that is true, and not allowed to write anything untrue! These are the only rules of mathematics.”

Find Out More