More Free Math and Logic Resources

File library
Photo by Drab Makyo.

I have a huge, long-neglected bookmarks folder labeled “To add to resource page.” I am never going to find time to sort and review all of those links. But if I post a few at random now and then, perhaps you will find something useful.

So here are five new links I am adding to my Free (mostly) math resources on the Internet page.

Worksheets and math practice

Daily Math Review
Three years’ worth of math review (7 assorted problems per day) for grades 6, 7, and 8 — with answers provided for the busy teacher.

Donna Young’s Math Pages
Worksheets, charts, drill pages, fraction manipulatives, triangular flashcards, and more — plus a great introduction to unit multipliers (also known as conversion factors).

Puzzles, games, and activities

Hex-a-hop
My all-time (so far) favorite logic game download. “There is no time limit and no real-time elements. The objective is simply to destroy all the green hexagonal tiles on each of the 100 levels. As you progress through the game, more types of tiles are introduced which make things more difficult and interesting.” For all ages.

How to Count to 1,023 on Your Fingers
A Java applet teaches you to count in binary or other bases. This can extend your counting range, but “caution is advised as the number four is prone to offend onlookers.”

Tim’s Interactive Puzzle Solution Center
A fun collection of “famous and other curious brain teasers” to solve online, some relatively easy and some quite challenging.


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Have more fun on Let’s Play Math! blog:

3 thoughts on “More Free Math and Logic Resources

  1. I think 132 in that finger-counting scheme is harder to explain.

    (17 or 34, depending on where you start, is awfully tough – when I was, hmm, 5th grade or so? I started counting things as I was going to sleep, using base 6 (right hand has digits 1-5, plus all down is 0), and that got me high enough (36) for most of my purposes.

    Jonathan

  2. I remember developing a finger counting method like the one on this website when I was in 8th or 9th grade, as a way to help myself understand binary numbers. But you’re right… Perhaps this is not the best way for our junior high boys to while away the time?

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