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Math Is Like a Nature Walk

Learning math is more like taking a meandering nature walk than like climbing a ladder of one-topic-after-another. Kids need to wander around the concepts, notice things, wonder about them, and enjoy the journey.

— Denise Gaskins
from a comment on the Living Math Forum


CREDITS: Background photo courtesy of Annie Spratt on Unsplash.

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Playful Math Carnival 122 at Arithmophobia No More

Check out the latest carnival of playful math for all ages:

Each monthly Playful Math Education Blog Carnival brings you a great new collection of puzzles, math conversations, crafts, teaching tips, and all sorts of mathy fun.

It’s like a free online magazine of mathematical adventures. Enjoy!

Sonya put together this carnival of evergreen links — helpful and inspiring no matter when you read them — featuring math comics, a couple conversations on Euler, Truchet and infinity tiles, Islamic art, counting and counting ropes, negative numbers, and more.

Click Here to Read the Carnival Blog

Want to Join in the Fun?

Do you have a favorite blog post about math activities, games, lessons, or hands-on fun? The Playful Math Blog Carnival would love to feature your article!

We welcome math topics from preschool through the first year of calculus. Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival.

To submit a blog article for consideration, fill out this form:

Yes! Please Share My Post

Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel free to submit another blogger’s post in addition to your own. Beginning bloggers are often shy about sharing, but like all of us, they love finding new readers.


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Math Game: Number Train

Math Concepts: number symbols, numerical order, thinking ahead.
Players: two or more.
Equipment: one math deck of playing cards (remove face cards and jokers), or a double deck for more than four players; additional cards to use as train cars.

Set-Up

Give each player four to six miscellaneous cards (such as the face cards and jokers you removed from the card deck) to serve as the cars of their number trains.

Lay these cards face down in a horizontal row, as shown. Shuffle the math card deck and spread it on the table as a fishing pond.

Line up the cars of your train.

How to Play

On your turn, draw one card and play it face up on one of your train cars. The numbers on your train must increase from left to right, but they do not need to be in consecutive order. If you do not have an appropriate blank place for your card, you have two choices:

• Mix the new card back into the fishing pond.

• Use the new number to replace one of your other cards, and then discard the old one.

The first player to complete a train of numbers that increases from left to right wins the game.

Two of the train cars have passengers. Which numbers could you put on the other cars?

Variations

House Rule: Decide how strict you will be about the “increases from left to right” rule and repeated numbers. Does “1, 3, 3, 7, 8” count as a valid number train? Or will the player have to keep trying for a card to replace one of the threes?

For older players: You can adapt Number Train to play with more advanced students:

Deal Alert!

CountingGames-300This post is an excerpt from my book Counting & Number Bonds: Math Games for Early Learners, available now at your favorite online book dealer.

One of my favorite stores, Rainbow Resource Center, is offering several of my books at a great discount.

Check them out!

Play. Discuss. Notice. Wonder.

You don’t need a set of worksheets or lesson plans to learn math. All you need is an inquiring mind and something interesting to think about.

Play. Discuss. Notice. Wonder.

Enjoy.

— Denise Gaskins
Playing Complex Fractions with Your Kids


CREDITS: Background photo courtesy of Steve Shreve on Unsplash.

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Playing Complex Fractions with Your Kids

This week, I’m working on graphics for my upcoming book 70+ Things to Do with a Hundred Chart. I had fun with this complex fraction image.

It looks a bit cluttered. Possible tweak: Remove the brackets and instead use a thicker dividing line to show the thirds.

While I’m thinking about that, would you like a sneak peek at an activity from the book?

Make Your Own Math

You don’t need a set of worksheets or lesson plans to learn math. All you need is an inquiring mind and something interesting to think about.

Play. Discuss. Notice. Wonder.

Enjoy.

Here’s how you can play complex fractions with your kids…

Start with Fraction Strips

Print a few blank 120 charts and turn them sideways, so each chart has ten rows with twelve squares in each row.

Cut out the rows to make fraction strips with twelve squares on each strip.

Color a different set of squares on each strip. On some strips, arrange the colored squares all together at one end. On other strips, mix them around.

If we count each strip as one whole thing, what fraction of its squares are colored?

Match the strips that represent the same fraction.

On some of the strips, there will be more than one way to name the fraction. For example, if six squares are colored, we can call that 6/12 or 2/4 or 1/2 of the strip. These alternate names are easiest to see when the colored squares are all at one end of the strip, because you can fold the strip to show the halves or fourths.

How many different fraction names can you find for each set of colored squares?

Look for Complex Fractions

We could also call the strip with six colored squares “1 1/2 thirds” of the whole strip. Can you show by folding why that name makes sense?

Or we could call the strip with five colored squares “2 1/2 sixths.”

When we have a fraction within a fraction like this, we call it a complex fraction, because it is more complicated than a common (or simple) fraction.

Another way to say it: Complex fractions have other fractions inside them.

A complex fraction is like a puzzle, challenging us to find its secret identity — the common fraction that names the same amount of stuff.

For example, how much is 3 1/3 fourths? One fourth would be three of the twelve squares on a fraction strip. So three fourths would be three sets of those three squares, or nine squares. Then we need to add one-third of the final fourth, which is one of the remaining three squares. So 3 1/3 fourths must be ten squares in all.

3 1/3 fourths = 10/12 = 5/6

How many complex fractions can you find in your set of fraction strips?

Challenge Puzzles

Can you figure out how much a one-and-a-halfth would be?

That is one piece, of such a size that it takes one and one-half pieces to make a complete fraction strip.

A one-and-a-halfth is a very useful fraction and was a favorite of the ancient Egyptian scribes, who used it to solve all sorts of practical math problems.

How about a one-and-a-thirdth? How many of those pieces make a whole strip? What common fraction names the same amount of stuff?

Or how much would a two-thirdth be? In that case, it only takes two-thirds of a piece to make a complete strip. So the whole piece must be greater than one. A two-thirdth’s secret identity is a mixed number. Can you unmask it?

Make up some challenge fraction mysteries of your own.

Complex2

Update…

I’m still working on the graphics for my hundred chart book. Here’s the latest version of the complex fraction strips.

I like this one much better.

What do you think?


CREDITS: The slogan “Make Math Your Own” comes from Maria Droujkova, founder and director of the Natural Math website. Maria likes to say: “Make math your own, to make your own math!”

70+ Things to Do with a Hundred Chart is part of my Playful Math Singles series. Coming soon to your favorite online bookstore…

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Playful Math Education Carnival 121 at nebusresearch

Check out the new playful math blog carnival at nebusresearch blog. Joseph put together a great collection of math games, activities, and teaching tips:

The carnival features classic puzzles, geometric art, Friedman numbers, scrambled times tables, mathematical comics, the friendship paradox, and a free online topology game. And much more — too many topics to list!

A few of the entries may push the limits of “school level” math, but there’s plenty of mathy fun to go around.

Click here to go read the carnival blog

And if you’re a blogger, be sure to submit your blog post for next month’s carnival!

Past carnivals are still full of mathy treasure. See them all on Pinterest:


CREDITS: Carnival photos (above) by Casey Horner and reyhan afif on Unsplash.

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.