Cardstock Geometry Puzzle

While browsing the Kim Komando website for ideas I could use in my blogging class, I followed a rabbit trail through Kim’s video archive. I think we will try this in Math Club next semester:

If the embedded video doesn’t work on your computer, you can find the original here: Unbelievable Paper Transformer.

Update

Simon posted a template for the puzzle at his MathsClass blog.


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Math Teachers at Play #20

blue icosahedron, by shonk[Photo by shonk.]

Welcome to the Math Teachers At Play blog carnival — which is not just for math teachers! If you like to learn new things and play around with ideas, you are sure to find something of interest.

Let’s start the mathematical fun with a couple of puzzles in honor of our 20th edition: First, the shape to our right is an icosahedron, one of the Platonic solids. Each face is an equilateral triangle — can you count them? For more fun, make your own model.

Continue reading Math Teachers at Play #20

Math Teachers at Play Changes

stopwatch hand by nDevilTV[Photo by nDevilTV.]

This month, our Math Teachers at Play blog carnival switched to a once-a-month schedule. We’ll publish the third Friday of each month — which is this week!

Teachers, homeschoolers, or anyone else who enjoys playing around with math: Wednesday night is the deadline to send in your thoughts, ideas, tips, or tricks about math using this handy submission form. Posts must be relevant to students or teachers of preK-12th grade mathematics. Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival. Most bloggers have interesting gems buried in our archives. Why not dust one off and share it anew?

Hosts Needed

With the schedule change, I also need to rebuild the queue for hosting the Math Teachers at Play. If you blog about teaching or learning in grades K-12, and if you write about math at least occasionally, I would love to have you consider hosting the carnival sometime. Here’s how to sign up:

  1. Check out the schedule on the “future hosts” tab at the MTaP home page,
  2. pick a month that fits your schedule,
  3. and then let me know.

And don’t worry if you’ve never hosted a blog carnival before — it’s easy, fun, and great publicity for your blog! I’ll send you a detailed email of instructions to get you started.


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Carnival of Mathematics #59

Welcome to the Carnival of Mathematics! We’ve got a full roster this time, including roller coasters, topological Turán theory, a mathematician arrested as a spy, a plane running out of fuel mid-flight, speed limits in Conway’s Game of Life, and much, much more…

The 59th Carnival of Mathematics features 59 blog posts (counting the multi-part posts and the carnival post itself) on a wide variety of interesting topics. Drop in and enjoy the browsing!


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Quotable: Politics

“Let’s give the governor a break,” says Williams College mathematician Edward Burger. “If nothing else, he’s encouraging math education.”

Carl Bialik
Coincidental Obscenity Deemed Extremely Dubious


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.