Math Teachers and Homeschool Bloggers: We Want You!

Do you have a favorite blog post about math activities, games, lessons, or hands-on fun? The Playful Math Blog Carnival would love to feature your article!

We welcome math topics from preschool through the first year of calculus. Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival.

Click here to submit your blog post

Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday, June 21. The carnival will be posted next week at Math Hombre blog.

Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel free to submit another blogger’s post in addition to your own. Beginning bloggers are often shy about sharing, but like all of us, they love finding new readers.

Need an Idea-Starter?

If you haven’t written anything about math lately, here are some ideas to get your creative juices flowing…

  • Talking Math with Kids: Children often have surprising insight. Even when they’re confused about math, their point of view can open our adult eyes to new understanding. Share your kids’ stories.
  • Games or Activities: Do you have a game, activity, or anecdote about teaching math to young students? We’d love to play along.
  • Lesson Ideas: This section is for arithmetic explorations, geometry puzzles, trig investigations, contest-preparation tips, and more. Can you make math topics come alive, so they will stick in a student’s mind?
  • Teaching Tips: Other teachers’ blogs are an important factor in my continuing education. The more I read about the theory and practice of teaching math, the more I realize how much I have yet to learn. So please, fellow teachers, don’t be shy — share your insights!
  • Mathematical Recreations: What kind of math do you do, just for fun?

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s carnival, you may enjoy:


CREDITS: “Chica usando ordenador” sketch (top) by Olga Berrios (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Playful Math Carnival 128 at Math Misery? Blog

Check out the new playful math blog carnival at Math Misery? blog. Manan Shah put together a great collection of number puzzles along with some math games, teaching tips, and more:

It’s like a free online magazine of mathematical adventures.

Enjoy!

And if you’re a blogger, be sure to submit your blog post for next month’s carnival!

Click here to go read the carnival blog

Do You Want More Ways to Play with Math?

Past carnivals are still full of mathy treasure. See them all on Pinterest:


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

10 Family-Favorite Games for Learning Math Through Play

Oops! I can’t believe I forgot to post these links when my latest book came out way back in March. Indie author fail…

Do you want your children to enjoy learning math?

Teach them how to play!

In excerpts from five of my most popular books, the Let’s Play Math Sampler features ten kid-tested games covering math concepts from counting to prealgebra.

Free Online Preview

Pick up a copy of the Let’s Play Math Sampler today, and make math a playful family adventure.

Buy now:
Amazon-logo the_book_depository_logo Barnes-Noble-logo kobo-logo ibookstore-badg Scribd_logo google-play-badge and other online retailers, or order the paperback by special request at your favorite local bookshop.

…And now I just need to go back and update my original pre-order post, so everyone can find the book no matter which blog they happen to read…


“Laughing Girl” photo (top) by ND Strupler via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

If you are a homeschooler or classroom teacher, student or independent learner, or anyone else who writes about math, now is the time to send in your favorite blog post for next week’s Playful Math Blog Carnival.

Click here to submit your blog post

Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday, May 24. The carnival will be posted next week at Math Misery? blog.

Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel free to submit another blogger’s post in addition to your own. Beginning bloggers are often shy about sharing, but like all of us, they love finding new readers.

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Help! I can’t keep the carnival going on my own.

Hosting the blog carnival can be a lot of work, but it’s fun to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival usually brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog.

If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Playful Math Blog Carnival homepage. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s carnival, you may enjoy:


PHOTO CREDIT: “L.A. County Fair” photo (top) by Omar Bárcena (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.]/span>

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

8 Weeks of Playful Math for Families

Yes, your kids CAN learn to love math. Keep your children’s math skills fresh this summer with my 8-week email series of math games and activities.

No purchase necessary! Just sign up for my email newsletter, and every week for the next two months you’ll automatically receive one of my favorite math club activities or an excerpt from my series of math game books.

Plus you’ll get a free download of my 24-page booklet How To Solve Math Problems: A Common-Sense Approach. And I’ll send you occasional news updates with playful math tips, resource links, and book sales or other promotions.

Click Here To Sign Up

Don’t like email? Then check out my new Let’s Play Math Sampler: 10 Family-Favorite Games for Learning Math Through Play. For the price of a cup of coffee, it’s a great way to get started with playful math.

PHOTO CREDITS: “The smiling sisters” photo by Caroline Hernandez and “Puddle Jumping” by Rupert Britton via Unsplash.com.

Math Activity: Polite Numbers

Did you know that numbers can be polite? In math, a polite number is any number we can write as the sum of two or more consecutive positive whole numbers.

(Consecutive means numbers that come one right after another in the counting sequence.)

For example, five is a polite number, because we can write it as the sum of two consecutive numbers:
5 = 2 + 3

Nine is a doubly polite number, because we can write it two ways:
9 = 4 + 5
9 = 2 + 3 + 4

And fifteen is an amazingly polite number. We can write fifteen as the sum of consecutive numbers in three ways:
15 = 7 + 8
15 = 4 + 5 + 6
15 = 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5

How many other polite numbers can you find?

You can build polite numbers (like fifteen) with a staircase of blocks.

What Do You Notice?

Are all numbers polite?

Or can you find an impolite number?

Can you make a collection of polite and impolite numbers? Find as many as you can.

How many different ways can you write each polite number as a sum of consecutive numbers?

What do you notice about your collection of polite and impolite numbers?

Can you think of a way to organize your collection so you can look for patterns?

What Do You Wonder?

Make a conjecture about polite or impolite numbers. A conjecture is a statement that you think might be true.

For example, you might make a conjecture that “All odd numbers are…” — How would you finish that sentence?

Make another conjecture.

And another.

Can you make at least five conjectures about polite and impolite numbers?

What is your favorite conjecture? Does thinking about it make you wonder about numbers?

Can you think of any way to test your conjectures, to know whether they will always be true or not?

Real Life Math Is Social

This is how mathematics works. Mathematicians play with numbers, shapes, or ideas and explore how those relate to other ideas.

After collecting a set of interesting things, they think about ways to organize them, so they can look for patterns and connections. They make conjectures and try to imagine ways to test them.

And mathematicians compare their ideas with each other. In real life, math is a very social game.

So play with polite and impolite numbers. Compare your conjectures with a friend.

Share your ideas in the comments section below.

And check out the list of student conjectures at the Ramblings of a Math Mom blog.


CREDITS: Numbers photo (top) by James Cridland via Flickr (CC BY 2.0). I first saw this activity at Dave Marain’s Math Notations blog, and it’s also available as a cute printable Nrich poster. For a detailed analysis, check out Wai Yan Pong’s “Sums of Consecutive Integers” article.

howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.