Egyptian Math: The Answers

Alexandria JonesRemember the Math Adventurer’s Rule: Figure it out for yourself! Whenever I give a problem in an Alexandria Jones story, I will try to post the answer soon afterward. But don’t peek! If I tell you the answer, you miss out on the fun of solving the puzzle. So if you haven’t worked these problems yet, go back to the original posts. Figure them out for yourself—and then check the answers just to prove that you got them right.

Continue reading Egyptian Math: The Answers

High School Math Challenge

The USA Mathematical Talent Search (USAMTS) has posted its current set of challenge problems, the first of four rounds scheduled for the 2007-2008 school year. USAMTS is a free competition open to all United States middle school and high school students. Young mathematicians have a little over a month (until October 9) to write and send in solutions for the five questions.

According to the USAMTS website:

Student solutions to the USAMTS problems are graded by mathematicians and comments are returned to the students. Our goal is to help all students develop their problem solving skills, improve their technical writing abilities, and mature mathematically while having fun. We wish to foster not only insight, ingenuity and creativity, but also the virtue of perseverance, which is equally essential in scientific endeavors.

A mere five questions. How hard can it be? (Ha!)


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A Very Short History of Mathematics

This paper was read to the Adams Society (St. John’s College Mathematical Society) at their 25th anniversary dinner, Michaelmas Term, 1948. [Warning: Do not attempt to read this while drinking coffee or other spittable beverage!]

Hat tip: I found this through the math carnival at a mispelt bog.

Update: The original page has disappeared from the internet, or at least I cannot find it any more, but the Internet Archive Wayback Machine came to the rescue. After my plea for help, James Clare pointed me to the article’s new home.


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Browsing the Edu-Blogs

Blog carnival graphic 3Both of my favorite education blog carnivals continue to grow, with posts in the 40-something range. That means plenty of variety for your browsing pleasure:

Carnival of Homeschooling: The “This is the Order They Came to My Inbox” Edition
The Headmistress and Zookeeper at The Common Room hosts this week’s “online homeschool support group meeting.”

The 134th Carnival of Education
Matthew at matthewktabor.com does a great job of organizing entries in the latest Carnival of Education. Future carnival hosts should look at this and learn the value of white space.

And here’s a bonus carnival, just for fun:

Make it from Scratch Carnival, edition #28
Summer at Summer’s Nook passes on great ideas from a score of creative bloggers.


howtosolveproblemsWant to help your kids learn math? Claim your free 24-page problem-solving booklet, and sign up to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

Carnival of Mathematics XV

Carnival of MathematicsAaargh—I missed it again! I suppose I should know better by now, but I sent in my entries (on time at least) via the blog carnival submission form. I have lost more carnival entries that way, but I still let myself be lured in by the ease of using a form, rather than writing a simple email by hand. Silly, lazy me.

Anyway, the latest Carnival of Mathematics is now open at a mispelt bog, with plenty of fun graphics and interesting things to read about.

Egyptian Geometry and Other Challenges

Rhind papyrus

Would you like to study “the knowledge of all existing things and all obscure secrets”? That is how Scribe Ahmose (also translated Ahmes) described his mathematical papyrus. Ahmose’s masterpiece is now called the Rhind Papyrus, after Alexander Henry Rhind, a Scotsman who was one of the first archaeologists to make meticulous records of his excavations (rather than simply hunting for treasures). Rhind purchased the papyrus from an antiquities dealer in Luxor, Egypt, in 1858.

Ahmose’s writing included a huge table of fractions as well as story problems, geometry, algebra, and accounting. Can you solve any of Scribe Ahmose’s problems?

Continue reading Egyptian Geometry and Other Challenges